2014-12-21

DEBATE on the Historicity of Jesus – Dr. Richard Carrier vs Trent Horn

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

by Neil Godfrey

I may be one of the last to know about this but for the record here it is. Now why can’t all tenured academics learn how to debate this topic civilly and respectfully like these two guys? Such a refreshing — and very informative — debate.

7 Comments

  • Tim
    2014-12-21 06:17:53 UTC - 06:17 | Permalink

    That really was a pretty good debate. I love how at one point they both admitted that they were “nerding out.” Also, I thought it was curious that Horn, as a Catholic, argued that “brother of the lord” means biological brother. I thought Catholics traditionally interpret that phrase as referring to apostolic brotherhood.

    • Tim Widowfield
      2014-12-21 09:28:52 UTC - 09:28 | Permalink

      The standard Catholic understanding of “brother of the Lord” is that it means James was a half-brother of Jesus — supposedly, the progeny of Joseph from a previous marriage. Other “brothers and sisters” were understood to be cousins of Jesus. The perpetual virginity of Marriage, which is an article of faith in Catholicism, requires that no other human was a full sibling of Christ.

      • Tim
        2014-12-21 16:17:22 UTC - 16:17 | Permalink

        I see. I wasn’t fully certain about this. BTW, here’s what the Catholic Encyclopedia says:

        “There is no reasonable doubt that in Galatians 1:19: ‘But other of the apostles [besides Cephas] I saw none, saving James the brother of the Lord’, St. Paul represents James as a member of the Apostolic college.”

        http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02767a.htm

        • Tim Widowfield
          2014-12-21 23:58:16 UTC - 23:58 | Permalink

          I stand corrected.

  • 2014-12-21 15:57:31 UTC - 15:57 | Permalink

    I didn’t know about it. Thanks for the link, Neil.

    And yes, this is how these debates are supposed to be done.

  • Pingback: Vridar » The Ostrich War On Mythicism

  • Pingback: Vridar » The Ostrich War On Mythicism

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *