2020-09-29

The Christian elites have always been more clear-eyed about Trump’s lack of religiosity than they’ve publicly let on

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by Neil Godfrey

The conservative Christian elites Trump surrounds himself with have always been more clear-eyed about his lack of religiosity than they’ve publicly let on. In a September 2016 meeting with about a dozen influential figures on the religious right—including the talk-radio host Eric Metaxas, the Dallas megachurch pastor Robert Jeffress, and the theologian Wayne Grudem—the then-candidate was blunt about his relationship to Christianity. In a recording of the meeting obtained by The Atlantic, the candidate can be heard shrugging off his scriptural ignorance (“I don’t know the Bible as well as some of the other people”) and joking about his inexperience with prayer (“The first time I met [Mike Pence], he said, ‘Will you bow your head and pray?’ and I said, ‘Excuse me?’ I’m not used to it.”) At one point in the meeting, Trump interrupted a discussion about religious freedom to complain about Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska and brag about the taunting nickname he’d devised for him. “I call him Little Ben Sasse,” Trump said. “I have to do it, I’m sorry. That’s when my religion always deserts me.”

And yet, by the end of the meeting—much of which was spent discussing the urgency of preventing trans women from using women’s restrooms—the candidate had the group eating out of his hand. “I’m not voting for Trump to be the teacher of my third grader’s Sunday-school class. That’s not what he’s running for,” Jeffress said in the meeting, adding, “I believe it is imperative … that we do everything we can to turn people out.”

The Faustian nature of the religious right’s bargain with Trump has not always been quite so apparent to rank-and-file believers. According to the Pew Research Center, white evangelicals are more than twice as likely as the average American to say that the president is a religious man. Some conservative pastors have described him as a “baby Christian,” and insist that he’s accepted Jesus Christ as his savior.

To those who have known and worked with Trump closely, the notion that he might have a secret spiritual side is laughable. . . .

Coppins, McKay. 2020. “Trump Secretly Mocks His Christian Supporters.The Atlantic, October 2020.

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Neil Godfrey

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3 thoughts on “The Christian elites have always been more clear-eyed about Trump’s lack of religiosity than they’ve publicly let on”

  1. Basically, the ‘conservative Christian elites’ know a grifter when they see one. After all, they are all experienced in grifting the general public. They want in on his grift.

  2. Trump’s religiosity is irrelevant to Trump-supporting evangelicals. Painting Trump as Christ-like is also unnecessary.

    What is relevant are his threats and actions taken to punish the transgressors: the queers, the gays, the same sex marriage people, the immigrants, the atheists, the lazy (wink), the shiftless (wink), and the liberals. Trump is reinforcing all of the reasons why evangelicals should stay as part of their movement. If transgressions against evangelical beliefs and mores were not punished severely, people would be opting off in droves.

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